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Emergency Boat Kill Switches & Lanyards

21 Items
 
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Cut-Off Switch
What will you do when you find yourself facing an emergency such as a man overboard or a barrier in the path of your boat? Each second makes a huge …
List price: $12.79
Starting at $9.35
In stock
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Cole-Hersee M-597 replacement parts
Includes coiled lanyard.
List price: $24.49
Only $17.34
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Johnson / Evinrude / OMC 398602 replacement parts
For: 15-60 HP (1987-90), Cobra Drives Applies for Johnson/Evinrude engines only Replaces OEM part # OMC 398602 Use with Ignition Kill Switch
List price: $10.05
Only $6.70
In stock
Seadog Universal Kill Switch
A kill switch comes with a lanyard that can be held by the boat driver. In case of an emergency, the helmsman can effortlessly pull the lanyard to …
List price: $6.95
Starting at:
$5.37
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Saf-T-Stop Safety Ignition Cut-Off Switch
For all single outboard installations Meets requirements of existing laws covering mandatory use of emergency stop switches Extra strong cloth …
List price: $29.99
Your price:
$25.90
In stock
Kwik Tek Boat Kill Switch Keys With Lanyard
Kwik Tek Boat Kill Switch Keys With Lanyard Be prepared; always carry a spare! If you lose or break your kill switch key, for whatever reason, you …
List price: $12.99
Your price:
$10.27
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Kwik Tek Ul-1 & 2 Ultimate Lanyard™ PWC Safety Lanyard
The Ultimate PWC safety lanyard has it all! 4 keys to fit ALL brands: SeaDoo, Yamaha, Kawasaki, Honda, Polaris, Tiger Shark and Wet Jet A stainless …
List price: $18.99
Starting at:
$14.78
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Seadog Kill Switch 7 Key Universal Lanyard
7 key lanyard fits Johnson, Evinrude, Mercury, Yamaha, Honda, Tohatsu, Suzuki, and Nissan kill switches. 50" length.
List price: $12.95
Your price:
$10.14
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SWITCH EMERGENCY CUT-OFF - Sierra
Emergency cut-off switch
List price: $31.79
Your price:
$22.95
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Keyed Battery Cutoff Switch - Trac Outdoor Products
This waterproof, keyed, single circuit on-off battery switch helps protect your battery and your watercraft from unwanted use or theft, and prevents …
List price: $13.95
In stock
LANYARD KILL SWITCH - Marpac
*Black rugged construction.* Fits a standard 3/4 tapered shaft helm.* Diameter 13.
List price: $9.98
Your price:
$8.31
In stock
Saf-T-Stop Safety Ignition Cut-Off Switch - T-H Marine Supply
For all single outboard installations Meets requirements of existing laws covering mandatory use of emergency stop switches Extra strong cloth …
List price: $29.99
Your price:
$25.90
In stock
Universal Kill Switch SeaDog Line
Stamped brass/injection molded nylon & delrin kill switch. Replace lanyard if worn, cut or frayed. Dual circuitry allows kill switch to be wired for …
List price: $12.50
Your price:
$8.75
In stock
Ignition Lanayard
Replaces OEM part # BRP/OMC 176288 Fits: 1996 and newer
List price: $10.89
Your price:
$7.99
In stock
Ignition Lanayard
Replaces OEM part # YAMAHA 682-82556-00-00
List price: $10.89
Your price:
$7.97
In stock
Emergency Cutoff Switch And Lanyard (Cole Hersee)
Weather resistant switch provides added safety for boat operators. The lanyard connects the boater to a switch which kills the ignition circuit if …
List price: $68.89
Your price:
$38.37
In stock
Kill Switch - Universal (Sea-Dog Line)
Dual circuitry allows kill switch to be wired for either ignition kill or magneto kill. WARNING: Test switch for proper function before each use. …
List price: $12.50
Your price:
$8.75
In stock
Seadog Electrical Parts & Accessories
Stamped 304 stainless steel. light arc is 20 pts., 225°. Carded.
List price: $1.50
Starting at:
$1.15
In stock
Made of stamped brass and molded nylon. Circuit is normally closed (complete) with lanyard clip in place on switch. When lanyard is pulled and clip …
List price: $13.50
Your price:
$9.69
In stock
Lanyard for emergency engine cut-off switch. Kills ignition when lanyard is pulled. For use with conventional or magneto ignitions. Seals out …
List price: $23.69
Your price:
$18.93
In stock
7 Key Kill Switch Lanyard, Universal - Seachoice
List price: $7.95
Starting at:
$7.11
In stock
21 Items
 
Boating Know How
Emergency Kill Switch

How to Install a Kill Switch

First of all, what is a kill switch? A kill switch is a simple wire is designed to disable an engine by briefly suspending the current flow. This switch is particularly essential in ... read more situations that call for an emergency automatic shut-down. All kill switches should have a lanyard added to it that will attach from the kill switch to the captain/driver.

Installing the key switch is a straight-forward step-by-step process. Follow these directions, and you can easily install this yourself.

Step One: Use the appropriate wrench to disconnect the negative battery cable.

Step Two: Choose a location to install the kill switch that is close to the control console.
– Locate the red wire leading to the ignition switch from the battery.
– Remove console cover (if there is one) by removing the screws with a screwdriver.

Step Three: Cut the red wire about 6 inches from the switch with pliers.
– Pull all loose wires out of the way and secure them with electrical or duct tape.
– Cut a hole in the console with a drill in your selected area.

Step Four: Insert one of your wires from the kill switch and one of the cut ends into opposite ends of a quick-connector.
– Crimp the connector shut with pliers.
– Wire does not have to be stripped.

Step Five: Apply silicone sealant over the ends of the connector.

Step Six: Repeat the quick connector attachment process.
– Use the remaining end of the ignition wire and the and the remaining kill switch wire.

Step Seven: Apply another layer of silicone sealant over second connector.

Step Eight: Insert the kill switch into the hole that is in the console from the rear.
– Secure it in place by screwing it in tightly.
– Tighten the attachment with pliers.

Step Nine: Secure the cut-up wires with the wire ties and reconnect the negative battery cable.

Step Ten: Insert the key into the switch and start the engine, then test it a few times.

*We do recommend obtaining or referring to a service/repair manual for assistance in this process.

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Boat safety Gear

Boating Safety Gear

This video will explain the most important tools too have on your boat to help keep you safe on the water. ... read more



Video Transcript

Rob Nelson: Hey everybody, it’s Rob Nelson here. I’m one of the hosts for the new boat-ed series. Sometimes you don’t bring the proper safety gear, in fact, you don’t even think about it. Because most of the time nothing happens out on the water. of course, that’s why we’re making this whole boat-ed series, to make sure that everybody stays safe. So I’m going to show you this little segment out of this little video that we produced on the proper safety gear to bring when you’re out on a boat, check it out. Female: Safety gear.

Rob Nelson: Risking your life to these things? Bad idea. You and all of your passengers will need US Coast Guard-approved life jackets. Try them on before you get on the boat. Keep them on at all times while underway and make sure to have at least one per passenger.

You’ll also need an ignition safety switch lane. Attach it to your life jacket and if you fall overboard it’ll shut off the engine. There is a sharp spinning propeller down there so if you don’t want to get diced into fish chum, use it. And be sure to carry signaling devices. Besides being smart, visual signals and sound producing devices are required by law in many places. Check for requirements where you are, always carry an extra set, and make sure that your flares aren’t expired. And you’ll need the right fire extinguisher. A Type B which means it’s designed for flammable liquids. And check to make sure it’s US Coast Guard-approved and in good, usable condition.

And don’t forget an extra drain plug. They’re small but important if you lose the one that’s in there. So be sure yours is in place, and carry extras just in place. Now, if you like that, you’re probably going to want to see the whole video at boat-ed.com. It’s a site where you can get certified in boat safety. Of course, leave comments for us, we’d love to hear from you and we’ll see you next time.

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Ignition Safety Switches

Ignition Safety Switches

This video will explain the importance and use of an emergency kill switch. ... read more



There's always a chance that some miscalculation or mishap will cause an operator to be thrown out of the driver's seat. There have been cases where people have been run over by their own boats; that's because an unman boat tends to run in hard, fast circles. So all boats and personal watercraft now have an emergency ignition safety switch.

The switch has a lanyard with a clip on the end. You just attach the clip to your wrist or your life jacket. Then if you're thrown out of your seat, the lanyard is pulled from the switch; which cuts off the engine. Remember, the safety switch only works if you do your part; so clip it on.

Courtesy of www.boat-ed.com
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